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Minnesota Dept Of Ag Now Investigating Dicamba Drift (Jul 25, 2017)
The Minnesota Department of Agriculture is investigating about two dozen complaints from farmers about a weed killer used on genetically modified soybean fields that can tolerate the herbicide. 
 
Minnesota agriculture department supervisor Greg Cremers said the complaints about dicamba started coming in earlier this month. 
 
"They're coming from all across the southern part of the state," Cremers said. "Starting to see a trend where a little more moving up into the central part of the state." 
 
Minnesota farmers told Minnesota Public Radio the herbicide drifts into non-resistant fields and hurts crops. Damaged vegetation will be tested in the coming months to see if diacamba is to blame. 
 
Tim Carlblom, who owns farmland in the southern Minnesota town of Jeffers, said his soybeans have rounded, cupped leaves that he believes are caused by the weed killer. He said he's worried it may impact the fall harvest. 
 
Agriculture company Monsanto introduced dicamba-resistant soybeans to the market. Robb Fraley, the company's chief technology officer, said dicamba has small-scale drift issues just like any herbicide, but that most of the damage is caused by farmer error. 
 
Some farmers may be using generic versions of the herbicide that have high volatility while others may not be properly cleaning their herbicide tanks, he said. 
 
"The vast majority of the farmers who've used this tool have used it safely and effectively," Fraley said. 
 
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