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USDA Announces Its Local Food Purchase Assistance Cooperative Agreement with Georgia

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) today announced it has signed a cooperative agreement with Georgia under the Local Food Purchase Assistance Cooperative Agreement Program (LFPA). Through LFPA, the Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA) seeks to purchase and distribute locally grown, produced, and processed food from underserved producers.

“USDA is excited to partner with Georgia to promote economic opportunities for farmers and producers and to increase access to locally sourced, fresh, healthy, and nutritious food in underserved communities,” said USDA Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs Jenny Lester Moffitt. “The Local Food Purchase Cooperative Agreement Program will improve food and agricultural supply-chain resiliency and increase local food consumption around the country.”

With the LFPA funding, the Georgia Department of Agriculture (GDA) will support local and underserved farmers and producers by building and expanding their economic opportunities. Purchases made from those partnerships will be distributed to rural, remote and local undeserved communities to ensure they receive nutritious and fresh foods.

“We are delighted to manage these resources for the benefit of Georgians. We are committed to helping those in need and equally focused on ensuring that every pound of produce procured comes from a Georgia Grown farm family. To support our own, it must be Georgia Grown” said Commissioner Gary W. Black.

The LFPA program is authorized by the American Rescue Plan to maintain and improve food and agricultural supply chain resiliency. Through this program, USDA will award up to $400 million through non-competitive cooperative agreements with state and tribal governments to support local, regional, and underserved producers through the purchase of food produced within the state or within 400 miles of delivery destination.

AMS looks forward to continuing to sign agreements under this innovative program that allows state and tribal governments to procure and distribute local and regional foods and beverages that are healthy, nutritious, and unique to their geographic area.

Source : usda.gov

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