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NCBA legislative conference strengthens farmer advocacy

By Farms.com

This year's National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Legislative Conference concluded successfully in Washington, D.C., serving as a critical platform for dialogue between cattle producers and federal policymakers. The three-day event drew over 300 producers who participated in 170 meetings, advocating for favorable adjustments in agricultural legislation and regulations.

According to NCBA President Mark Eisele, these discussions are invaluable as they allow farmers to directly convey the impact of governmental decisions on their livelihoods. The conference featured meetings with representatives from various federal agencies, including the USDA and EPA, focusing on topics crucial to the sustainability and growth of the cattle industry.

During the conference, NCBA members highlighted their priorities for the upcoming Farm Bill, stressing the importance of policies that support animal health, disaster relief, and risk management. They also argued for the reduction of excessive regulatory interference which they believe stifles agricultural innovation and efficiency.

The conference tackled the challenges posed by foreign animal diseases and the ongoing criticisms from animal rights activists. By engaging directly with lawmakers and agency staff, NCBA members aim to safeguard their industry and ensure that agricultural policies remain grounded in the realities of farm operations.

NCBA’s proactive approach in Washington is a testament to the organization's leadership and its commitment to representing the interests of cattle producers nationwide. The conference not only provided a forum for effective advocacy but also highlighted the importance of continuous engagement in the policymaking process to secure a favorable environment for the agricultural sector.


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