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Ag in the Manitoba Liberals platform

Ag in the Manitoba Liberals platform

A new proposed debt relief tool will support producers

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

With Manitobans heading to polling stations on Oct. 3, Farms.com is highlighting what the main political parties have in store for the ag community.

Dougald Lamont and the Manitoba Liberals are hoping to improve on the three seats the party won in 2019. A party needs four seats to receive official party status.

A debt relief tool is part of the Liberal plan, which will support producers.

This tool would provide an opportunity for farmers and business owners to meet with their lenders.

“We will create a new “Debt Compromise Board” which will provide Manitoba businesses and farmers a forum where they can meet with their lender to find ways to restructure debts so we keep farmers on the farm and businesses up and running,” the Liberal platform says.

The Liberals also promise to include farmers in their climate change initiatives.

The party commits to supporting farmers for their good land stewardship.

If elected, the Liberals will “set up a carbon credit system that will enable payments for farmers for ecological services and sustainable land stewardship,” the document reads.

Lamont’s Liberals will also create the Green Fund.

This $300-million initiative will support efforts to restore the environment.

“Efficiency programs for producers to reduce the impact of agricultural greenhouse emissions, such as N02,” will be eligible to receive funding.

In addition, the Liberals will work with farmers and other communities to “create wilderness corridors and restore habitats such as forests, wetlands (and) grasslands.”

The Progressive Conservatives outlined promises to farmers last week.

Click here to see what the Manitoba NDP promised to farmers and rural communities.


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