Farms.com Home   Ag Industry News

Do you know Sask.’s rules of the road for farm equipment?

Do you know Sask.’s rules of the road for farm equipment?

With harvest underway, farm equipment and regular vehicles will share the road

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

Harvest is underway in Saskatchewan.

Farmers in the province have harvested about 5 per cent of their 2022 crops, the latest Crop Report says.

Harvest season means producers will be transporting farm equipment between fields and sharing the roads with other motorists.

With that at top of mind, Farms.com created a quiz to test farmers on their knowledge on Saskatchewan’s road regulations with respect to ag equipment.

1) Equipment traveling slower than 40km/h must be equipped with a slow-moving-vehicle sign.

True or False?

2) Loaded farm equipment cannot be hauled after 12 p.m. on Sundays.

True or False?

3) Farmers need a permit to move farm equipment at night on a non-designated highway.

True or False?

4) If moving farm equipment without a permit, over-dimension signs and flashing beacons are:

Mandatory or Recommended?

5) A permit is required to move farm equipment on Highway 5 from Watson to Saskatoon.

True or False?

6) If traveling from an equipment dealership to a farm, an escort vehicle isn’t required.

True or False?

7) Tractors and other self-propelled pieces of equipment must have two white tail lamps visible from the back.

True or False?

8) A manufactured sprayer trailer can be a maximum of 4.27m wide for annual permits.

True or False?

9) A seat belt is mandatory when operating farm equipment.

True or False?

10) A permit is required for equipment that is towed behind a vehicle or that is self-propelled on a non-designated provincial highway when travelling during daylight hours.

True or False?

Be sure to check back later in the week to see how many questions you answered correctly.


Trending Video

NFU Safety on the Farm: Livestock Handling

Video: NFU Safety on the Farm: Livestock Handling

When you work on a farm, you need to be careful that bad habits don’t creep in and make your routines dangerous. Outlined below are some good habits for you and your crew when handling livestock, whether it is pigs, sheep, goats or cattle.
 

Comments


Your email address will not be published