Farms.com Home   News

Bin cleanup on Minnesota farm hit by derecho may wait until after planting ... if planting ever happens

Farm Service Agency Administrator Zach Ducheneaux and other officials visited Minnesota farms on May 19 to take a look at the damage from the storm that blew through a week before. High winds ripped apart grain bins and mangled irrigation and other equipment as well as damaging houses and other buildings.
Joe Stroman says the huge storm that swept across the upper Midwest wiped out about half his on-farm grain storage.

But before he worries about replacing the storage, he has to get a crop in the ground, and he hasn’t even started planting yet. Then there is the grain handling system that needs fixing after the storm.

There will be a long line grain of farmers wanting storage and handling equipment to be repaired.

“It might be a challenge to get bins built next year,” said Stroman, who farms near the town of Alberta, south of Morris in west-central Minnesota

Farm Service Agency Administrator Zach Ducheneaux and other officials visited Stroman’s farm on Thursday, May 19, to take a look at the damage from the storm that blew through a week before. High winds ripped apart grain bins and mangled irrigation and other equipment as well as damaging houses and other buildings.

Click here to see more...

Trending Video

Prairie Organics 2022: What Makes Soil Healthy

Video: Prairie Organics 2022: What Makes Soil Healthy

Prairie Organics: Think Whole Farm 2022 Recorded Session - 8 February 2022 - Yamily Zavala talks about soil health sampling protocols, what soil health indicators need to be tested, and what the CARA Soil health Lab reports offer. Evaluating the soils on your farm will give you the basic information you need to start the process for healing soils. She will also discuss what to monitor during this process with whatever management strategies you have implemented. Soil Health and Crop Management Specialist and Soil Health Lab Manager, Dr. Yamily Zavala has managed the Chinook Applied Research Association’s crop and soil program for the past eight years. Prior to joining the CARA staff, she was a crop production consultant based out of Ottawa where project work took her to Central and South America as well as points in the south and west of Africa. Early in her career, Yamily was a Soil Scientist for the National Agricultural Research Foundation at the Táchira State Research Center in Venezuela.