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Saskatchewan Announces Extension For FRWIP Applications

Livestock producers will have more time to work on their applications for the Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program.

Agriculture Minister David Marit says they recognize the challenges producers have been facing with the drought when it comes to finding contractors and materials to complete their water development projects.

"It is important to provide more time for producers to complete their water projects, so they can take advantage of additional funding to develop secure and sustainable water sources to meet the needs of their operation and help them mitigate the impacts of future dry conditions."

With that in mind, the Federal and Provincial Governments have adapted FRWIP to allow livestock producers who plan to claim over $50,000 in rebates - to submit a preliminary application by March 31, 2022, to complete their project(s) - and then submit the paperwork for the rebate by September 30, 2022.

Federal Agriculture Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau notes the past year has been a harsh reminder of how important water reliability is to agricultural producers.

"By extending the Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program, we are giving farmers more time to complete projects such as dugouts, wells and pipelines, that will help to ensure a better supply of this essential resource for livestock."

On July 14, 2021, the Government of Saskatchewan announced changes to temporarily increase the maximum funding a livestock producer can receive from the Farm and Ranch Water Infrastructure Program for dugouts, wells and pipelines. For the period April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022, the maximum rebate, for livestock producers only, increased to $150,000. The first $50,000 is based on a 50-50 cost-share and the remaining $100,000 is a 70-30 government-producer cost-share.

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