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Saskatchewan Harvest Underway as Heat, Dryness Accelerates Crops

Some early harvesting has begun in Saskatchewan as continued hot, dry weather further pushes crops to maturity.

“Heat has accelerated the ripening and maturation of all crops across the province and some producers have begun harvesting,” said the latest provincial crop report on Thursday. “The estimated yields for many crops across the province (are) expected to be well below average. Any rain now won't increase yields but would have a positive effect next year.”

Rainfall this past week varied throughout the province, ranging from none in many areas to 55 mm in areas around Indian Head and Neilburg. The Lumsden area received 33 mm, the Langenburg area 30 mm and the Saltcoats 24 mm.

Meanwhile, above normal temperatures combined with a lack of substantial rainfall have caused topsoil moisture levels to continue to trend downward. Cropland topsoil moisture in the province was rated as 4% adequate, 38% short and 58% very short as of Monday, versus 8% adequate, 39% short and 53% very short the previous week.

The prolonged drought conditions have rapidly deteriorated crop conditions and a majority of crops are rated as poor to fair. While some producers have started harvesting, while others are still assessing yields and determining if cutting and baling is the better option.

“Strong winds, drought stress, hail, heat and grasshoppers took their toll on crops this past week. There is little producers can do at this point in the season to address these environmental factors out of their control,” the report said.

Southeast:

Rainfall varied throughout the region this week, with areas around Indian Head receiving the most rain in the province with 55 mm. The Whitewood area received 18 mm while the Moosomin, Broadview and Tantallon areas received 15 mm. The rain was a welcome sight but will not drastically change the current dry growing conditions.

Topsoil moisture conditions have deteriorated in the region, with more land being rated short or very short. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as nine per cent adequate, 62 per cent short and 29 per cent very short.

Crop conditions vary within the region, but the majority of crops are in poor-to-good condition. Many producers have indicated that they are planning to begin harvest and will start desiccating pulse crops within the week while others have already started combining.

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to drought stress, strong winds, localized hail as well as damage caused by grasshoppers.

Southwest:

Minimal rainfall was received in the southwest region this past week, with the Consul area receiving the most with 9 mm. More rainfall will be needed soon to support crop and pasture development for next year, it is too late for this year's crop to be saved by a timely rain. The Rockglen and Shaunavon areas received five mm, the Big Beaver area two mm and three mm in the Tyner area.

Topsoil moisture conditions have reduced in the region this past week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as two per cent adequate, 30 per cent short and 68 per cent very short.

The majority of crops in the southwest region are in very poor-to-fair condition. The region did not receive rain at crucial times during the growing season and that has left the crops thin and stunted making many fields only good to be harvest as cattle feed. Crop yield is expected to be much lower than average. Some producers in the region have begun to harvest pulse crops such as lentils.

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to drought stress, strong winds and heat.

East-Central:

Rainfall in the region ranged from nil to 33 mm in the Lumsden area. The Langenburg area received 30 mm, the Saltcoats area 24, the Esterhazy and Yorkton areas 14 mm and the Preeceville area 10 mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have continued to deplete in the region. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as four per cent adequate, 36 per cent short and 60 per cent very short.

Crop development continues to progress quickly this past week due to warm temperatures. The majority of the crop in the region is rated as being in poor to good condition. Most of the region is suffering under severe drought stress but there are pockets where more rainfall was received and the crops in these areas look slightly better.

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to drought stress and wind. There have also been reports of damage from heavy localized rain and minor hail storm, which resulted in flattened crops.

West-Central:

Minimal rainfall was reported in many areas of the west-central region this past week with the Cando area receiving the most with 15 mm. The Phippen area received 12 mm, the Rosetown, Marengo, and Kindersley areas all received three mm. The west central region has not received a significant rainfall in several weeks and the crops are struggling severely.

Topsoil moisture conditions have reduced in the region this past week with more land now being rated as short for moisture. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as one per cent adequate, 28 per cent short and 71 per cent very short.

The majority of crops in the west-central region are in poor-to-fair condition. Producers have indicated that crops are doing poorly with many fields good for nothing besides green feed. Some producers are prepping to harvest their barley and wheat fields and starting desiccate their pulses while other producers have started combing pea and lentil fields.

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to localized wind and hail storms, drought and grasshoppers.

Northeast:

There was a varied amount of rainfall in the region, ranging from nil to 25 mm in the Christopher Lake area. The Spruce Home area received five mm and the Bruno area received three mm.

Topsoil moisture conditions have drastically declined this past week. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as, zero per cent adequate, 44 per cent short and 56 per cent very short.

The majority of crop are in poor-to-fair condition. Crops across the region are showing signs of severe drought stress and many fields are stunted and thin. Pulse fields are being desiccated and harvest prep is well underway.

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to drought stress, wind and heat.

Northwest:

Most of the northwest region received at least some rainfall this past week with the most rain being received on the west half of the region. The Neilburg area received the most with 17 mm followed by Frenchmen Butte area with 12mm, the Turtleford area 10 mm, the Spiritwood area nine mm and the Speers and Meadow Lake areas five mm.

Moisture conditions continue to drop in the region. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as five per cent adequate, 33 per cent short and 62 per cent very short

Most of the crop damage this past week was due to drought stress, strong winds and heat. A storm rolled through and damaged many bins and there were localized hail storms that caused minor crop damage.

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Let's get the GREEN PEAS off before we get more rain and my field floods

Video: Let's get the GREEN PEAS off before we get more rain and my field floods

We are a family farm in Ontario showing you what we do on are farm to produce eggs. today we are harvesting are green peas its still wet out and we are still getting way to much rain.