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$30 Million Local Food Initiative for Ontario

Sep 17, 2013
By Denise Faguy
Assistant Editor, North American Content, Farms.com

The Ontario government announced on Monday that a new Local Food Fund is now accepting applications. Over the next three years, the Ministry of Agriculture and Food will be investing $30 million to create jobs and support innovative local food projects.

“Supporting local food does so much for Ontario,” says Premier Kathleen Wynne. “We are committed to working with our industry partners to increase the demand for local food, which will feed local economies across the province.”

The Local Food Fund is part of the Ontario government’s overall strategy on local food which seeks to increase awareness and demand for foods that are grown and made in Ontario.  There are four categories of funding for the program, two specifically related to farming and agri-businesses or local farms with consumer outreach.

Education, Marketing and Outreach – these include projects that focus on marketing and promotional activities that improve consumer awareness and demand for local foods, such as promoting local culinary destinations, organic products, seasonal availability, and food festivals, or the promotion of new products.

Regional and Local Food Networks – these projects focus on building capacity along the value food chain through information sharing and collaboration between value chain partners, the end result being the improvement to access and supply of local foods.  These types of projects also include ones that focus on strengthening the entire supply chain and encourage value chains.      

The other two categories include Enhanced Technologies, Capacity and/or Minor Capital, and Research and Best Practices.

Farmers interested in obtaining an application form should visit www.Ontario.ca/localfood.


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