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Alberta Ag Hall of Fame nomination deadline approaching

Alberta Ag Hall of Fame nomination deadline approaching

Albertans can submit nominations until May 6

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

Albertans only have a short time remaining to submit nominations for the Alberta Agriculture Hall of Fame’s class of 2022.

The nomination period, which opened March 14, will close on May 6.

After the nominations are entered, a selection panel representing different parts of Alberta’s ag industry, will vet the submissions.

The deputy minister of agriculture, forestry and rural economic development (Shannon Marchand), appoints the selection panel.

The ministry of agriculture inducts up to three people every two years.

The most recent inductees entered the hall of fame in 2020.

They were Walter Paszkowski, David Price and George Visser.

Since the hall of fame opened in 1951, 138 Albertans have been inducted.

The first hall of famer listed is Frank Collicutt (1877-1964).

Collicutt moved from New Brunswick to Alberta in 1899, University of Calgary archives say.

He purchased land in 1898 that became the Willow Springs Ranch in the Crossfield-Airdrie district.

Between 1904 and 1912 he bought cattle for P. Burns meat packers. And over the next 30 years would grow his Hereford herd to the largest in North America.

Positions he held in the ag industry during his lifetime included:

  • President of the Canadian Hereford Association, Alberta Cattle Breeders’ Association and the Alberta Hereford Association.
  • Life director of the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede

The other members of the inaugural Alberta Ag Hall of Fame class in 1951 include Mr. Claude Gallinger, Mr. Joe Johnson, Mr. C.S. Noble and Dr. Harry Wise Wood.


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