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Canadian attitudes shift towards sustainable eating

By Jean-Paul McDonald
Farms.com

Sodexo Canada's first-ever Sustainable Food Barometer, conducted in collaboration with Leger, presents insightful data on Canadians' sustainable food habits and intentions. The survey, involving over 1,500 Canadians, provides a comprehensive picture of the current state and aspirations of Canadians in terms of sustainable eating. 

A notable finding is that a vast majority of Canadians (87%) recognize the urgency of adopting more sustainable eating habits. This awareness is reflected across all age groups and income levels, particularly among young adults aged 18-24. Interestingly, Canadians are already making strides in this direction, with 75% reducing household food waste, 68% eating seasonal produce, and 56% opting for local produce. 

However, the survey also highlights a gap between intentions and actions. Financial considerations and entrenched eating habits pose significant barriers to making more profound changes. Price remains the most crucial factor for Canadians when shopping for groceries, followed by taste and nutritional value. 

Despite these challenges, there is a willingness among Canadians to reduce their consumption of animal proteins and dairy products, aligning with global trends. The primary motivations for sustainable eating are health benefits and financial savings, with a significant number of Canadians also valuing food autonomy and setting an example for future generations. 

Sodexo Canada, recognizing its influential role, is committed to offering more sustainable food choices and reducing its environmental impact. The company's efforts include sustainable sourcing, offering plant-based recipes, optimizing energy use, and expanding the WasteWatch program to reduce food waste.  


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