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North Dakota activates Harvest Hotline

North Dakota activates Harvest Hotline

The hotline was first implemented in 1992 to address custom combining needs

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

The North Dakota government has activated a phone number to match farmers who require custom combining services with combine owners looking for work.

North Dakotans who fit into either category can call the Harvest Hotline at 701-425-8454.

“Your name and information will be entered into the Harvest Hotline database to be matched up with other callers,” State Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said in a statement. “Both farmers and harvesters are already utilizing the service.”

The free hotline is available weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Callers can also leave messages on weekends.

The hotline was first implemented during the harvest of 1992 and has been an annual service since.

That year, adverse weather caused the demand for custom combining services to increase.

Farmers and combiners can also view the Harvest Hotline map.

The map features icons of combines.

Clicking on those icons will bring up equipment and contact information about custom combiners in the area.

Elsewhere in the U.S., the developers of an app designed to connect farmers with other producers looking for help, celebrated the app’s one year anniversary.

Three Iowa women created Farmmee in 2021.

Since then, more than 1,000 people have downloaded the app.

“There are gaps in farming communities when it comes to connecting farmers with farmers,” said Molly Woodruff an Iowa farmer and Farmmee’s CEO, the Kiowa County Signal reported. “Farmers consistently tell us their biggest need, or gap, is when their equipment breaks down or when they need extra equipment quickly. It is hard to find experienced help, especially when they’re working with tight timelines.


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