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U.S. Senators reintroduce Climate Growing Solutions Act

U.S. Senators reintroduce Climate Growing Solutions Act

The bill proposes federal support to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through carbon markets

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

U.S. Senators have reintroduced an ag-related climate bill into the U.S. Senate with bipartisan support.

Senators Mike Braun (R-IN), Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) and others once again introduced the Growing Climate Solutions Act.

The bill would create a certification program within the United States Department of Agriculture to help farmers and landowners who enroll in the carbon credit marketplace. The USDA would also outline protocols for carbon markets and provide guidelines for how third-party businesses can become “USDA Certified” under the program.

The 2021 version of the bill contains two changes to the version introduced last year.

An advisory council will be made up of farmers and other stakeholders. And the bill includes $4 million in start-up funding.

The bill has received support from multiple people and groups within ag.

The American Farm Bureau Federation “welcomes the introduction of the Growing Climate Solutions Act, which builds on the strong foundation of environmental stewardship in American agriculture by providing more clarity and guidance for farmers and ranchers as they explore or expand participation in carbon markets,” said Zippy Duvall, president of the AFBF.

“Farmers want to do the right thing for their farms, their ranches, so that they can sustain those operations, not just over their lifetime, but over generations,” said Brent Bible, a corn and soybean grower from Indiana. “This Act gives us the opportunity to do those things and have some guidance and direction in what practices are good for the environment and there is an economic benefit for doing those particular things.”

Farms.com has reached out to members of the ag community for comment.


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