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Alberta Crop Conditions Up with Moisture

Alberta crop conditions inched higher this past week amid improving soil moisture conditions. 

The latest weekly crop report on Friday pegged the overall condition of major crops in the province (spring wheat, barley, oats, canola and peas) at about 78% good to excellent as of Tuesday. That is up a couple of points from the previous week and is near both the five- and 10-year averages of 79% and 77% good to excellent, respectively. 

The spring wheat crop was rated 84% good to excellent as of Tuesday, up 4 points on the week, while barley and peas both gained 2 points to improve to 78%. The condition of the canola crop was also up 2 points, improving to 73% good to excellent. The oat crop added 4 points from the previous week to 86% good to excellent. 

Crop conditions in the Central region are the best at 88% good to excellent, followed by the North East and North West at 82% and the Peace at 81%. At just 62% good to excellent, crop conditions are lagging in the South region following earlier prolonged dryness. 

Precipitation across the province last week ended the dry conditions dating back to last summer, the report said. While the moisture has mostly been welcome, there were reports of localized overland flooding. More rain is in the forecast to provide additional moisture in the central parts of the province, with lesser, but still appreciated, amounts expected in the more southern areas, it added. 

Sub-surface soil moisture reserves, which were significantly depleted, now continue to build. Compared to the long-term normal, soil moisture is near normal or moderately higher than normal in most parts of the province, the report said. However, soil moisture is still low in some parts of the North West Region, along with some localized areas in the South and North East regions. 

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