Farms.com Home   News

Rising input prices present challenges for Manitoba farmers

A rise in input prices has left this year’s crop costs abnormally high for Manitoba farmers.

Since the fall of 2021, costs for chemicals, fertilizer and fuel have skyrocketed due to fallout from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and supply chain issues caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Some individuals were able to purchase fertilizer last fall and have not seen the same type of increase,” Bill Campbell, President of the Keystone Agricultural Producers, told CTV News. "But all indications are that even fall application in 2022 will have a significantly increased cost.”

Transportation costs for imports and exports have also risen due to the climb in fuel prices.

Will Turner was one of those lucky farmers who bought all the fertilizer he needed when it was cheaper.

“Different farms will do different purchasing methods depending on their cash flow requirements,” Turner said. “So in this case we’re lucky that we did it in full when it was significantly cheaper.”

Although he’s been lucky in that regard, Turner hasn’t had the same luck with his cattle.

“With the price of feed, because the price of commodity is so high, cattle prices are not going to account for really any profit at all,” he said.

Turner predicts he will still be able to generate enough revenue to cover the increased costs, thanks in part to long term planning. 

Click here to see more...

Trending Video

Kansas Wheat Update Spring 2022

Video: Kansas Wheat Update Spring 2022

Agronomist wheat extension specialist Romulo Lollato talks about the wheat condition in Kansas.