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Ways To Combat Blackleg In Canola

In Manitoba last year, there were elevated rates of blackleg in canola, however overall the levels were relatively low.
 
That from Justine Cornlesen, agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada.
 
She gave some advice to farmers during a webinar this week.
 
"First off, as always, is crop rotation. Crop rotation falls into any sort of integrated pest management approach, especially with blackleg. It is a stubble born disease, each year you can allow that old infected residue to break down in the field, the better off you're going to be. There's not going to be that pressure on your future canola crops. So if you're able to allow at least a two-year break that should allow most of that stubble to decompose in the field, which works out well for Manitoba."
 
Cornelsen notes they also place a huge emphasis on scouting.
 
"Actually knowing what to be looking for and how to tell the difference between that and other diseases. That's something that's a little trickier, but you've got to know what you're working with. From there, you can then deploy a bunch of other management practices. In Canada, everything we grow is resistant to blackleg or moderately resistant, so that's a checkmark that we all get. From there we're now really focusing on stewarding the genetics, so this is where understanding what major genes are within the hybrids that producers are using and then how they can match the predominant blackleg races within the field."
 
Fungicide use is another measure, although Cornelsen notes that foliar applications are not very common as producers don't see a return on investment. She adds fungicide seed treatments are now available as well.
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