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End of an era and a new beginning for International Ag Shipping Terminal

Ports of Indiana, a state-owned port authority, is on the lookout for a new operator for its International Ag Shipping Terminal at Burns Harbor. The terminal, which has been operated by Cargill for 44 years, can handle various modes of transportation, including ocean vessels, 1,000-foot lake vessels, barges, and unit trains. It has a storage capacity of 7.2 million bushels and a loading capacity of 90,000 bushels per hour. Cargill announced that it is leaving the terminal as it changes its business model in the region.

Ports of Indiana will take over the facility on June 1 and is looking for a long-term partner to help grow shipments at the port. The port authority is seeking qualifications from companies interested in operating the terminal and will issue a formal request for proposals in May to all qualified companies. The deadline for responses to the request for qualifications is April 21.

The Burns Harbor port, which opened in 1970, is home to over 30 companies and handles around 3 million tons of cargo per year. The port is currently undergoing a $32 million facilities expansion, funded by two federal grants, which includes the construction of new terminals, rail yards, a bulk warehouse, and a truck marshalling yard. The port complex contributes $5.2 billion per year to the Indiana economy and supports over 30,000 jobs.

The departure of Cargill from the International Ag Shipping Terminal marks the end of an era, but also presents a unique opportunity for the facility to expand its capabilities and reimagine its operations. The port's director, Ryan McCoy, is excited about the next chapter for the terminal and has received multiple inquiries from companies interested in operating the facility. The deep-water terminal has tremendous capabilities for shipping grain, DDGs, and bulk cargoes to and from ocean vessels at the Heartland of America.
 


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