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FeedList, Hay Hotline Connect Livestock Feed Buyers, Sellers

Drought is creating forage shortages throughout North Dakota this year, which means producers will have to find alternative sources of feed for their livestock.

North Dakota State University and the North Dakota Department of Agriculture can help connect those who need feed with those who have it.

Farmers and ranchers who have feedstuffs such as hay or corn for sale can list it on NDSU’s FeedList website, which is designed to connect feed sellers and buyers. Producers also may list pasture they have for rent.

The FeedList, at https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/feedlist, shows what each seller has for sale, how the feed is stored (large round bales, small bales, etc.) and the seller’s contact information. Prospective buyers can select what they want to buy and contact the sellers. Using the FeedList is free of charge.

This site also may be used to donate or receive donations.

Anyone who wants to buy feed or has feed to sell or donate can complete an online form at the site. Those who need entry help can contact their county office of NDSU Extension.

All entries will be deleted automatically after 90 days. Buyers and sellers who no longer need the FeedList’s services before that should contact the Feedlist coordinator, Elizabeth Cronin, at elizabeth.cronin@ndsu.edu to have the entry removed.

North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring has reactivated the Hay Hotline and interactive map. The Hay Hotline and interactive map list those who need hay, those with hay or feed to sell, those with pasture or hay land to rent, those with Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land for grazing and haying once it becomes available, and those available to move hay. The map is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda. Users may click on the icons to retrieve information about available hay, pasture, hay land and CRP land in their area.

Source : ndsu.edu

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