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Ghana Officially Opens its Market to US Pork and Pork Products Export

In a signed letter to the Veterinary Medical Officer of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), dated January 12, 2023, the Acting Chief Veterinary Officer of the Ghanaian Veterinary Services Directorate of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture acknowledged receipt of the FSIS’ proposed certificate of export for pork and pork products, and confirmed its acceptance. The Ghanaian market is now officially open to U.S. exports of pork and pork products in addition to other meat products from the United States.

Market access request for pork and pork products was made by USDA’s FSIS on October 24, 2022 and facilitated by FAS Accra. FSIS proposed the use of the FSIS 9060-5 export certificate form for pork and pork products from the United States to Ghana. Responding to the request by USDA’s FSIS to confirm the acceptance of the proposed export certificate for pork and pork products, the Chief Veterinary Officer of Ghana’s Veterinary Services Directorate of the Ministry of Food and Agriculture indicated in a signed letter dated January 12, 2023, that Ghana will accept the proposed export certificate by the FSIS, to cover all U.S. meat products, including beef, goat, lamb, pork, poultry, etc. Ghana’s imported pork and pork products market was valued at $16 million in 2021. Total imports increased steadily from 2017, hitting 15,000 metric tons (MT) in 2021. The market is dominated by the EU, with the United States not being a significant player. The opening of the market to U.S. pork and pork products is therefore an opportunity that can be exploited by U.S. exporters.

Pork product export to Ghana

Source : fas.usda

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