Farms.com Home   News

U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) Extends Name To International Operations

The U.S. Soybean Export Council (USSEC) is extending the use of the USSEC name internationally.  The organization operated as American Soybean Association – International Marketing (ASA-IM) outside of the United States since its inception in 2006.  The transition to USSEC will be complete by June 30, 2013.  USSEC operates five regional offices in Beijing, Amsterdam, Dubai, Guadalajara, and Singapore implementing U.S. soy promotions in over 80 countries.

Danny Murphy, President, American Soybean Association (ASA), said, “As a co-founder of USSEC, ASA is excited to see USSEC enter into this next chapter of carrying out international market development for ASA, the soybean checkoff, and the U.S. soybean industry.  Since opening its first international marketing office in Tokyo in 1956, ASA has been committed to developing new markets for U.S. soy, and we are proud of the global presence that the one office has grown into. USSEC continues the successful joint work between ASA, USB, FAS and all soybean industry stakeholders to develop commercial markets for U.S. soy internationally.”

U.S. soybean farmers met international soy demand by exporting more than 1.8 billion bushels of U.S. soy in 2012. This includes 1.3 billion bushels of whole soybeans, meal from more than 404 million bushels of soybeans and the oil from 126.5 million bushels of soybeans. U.S. soy exports for the year are valued at more than $23 billion.

Randy Mann, Chairman of the Board, USSEC, and ASA Vice-President and Secretary of the Board from Kentucky stated, “Having a single identity globally will allow us to demonstrate the alignment of the U.S. Soy Family’s International Marketing efforts on behalf of the U.S. soy growers, the USDA and the U.S. soy industry.”

Click here to see more...

Trending Video

GROW Wetland Enhancement - Central Assiniboine WD

Video: GROW Wetland Enhancement - Central Assiniboine WD

There are many sustainable practices that producers can do to improve their watershed, while benefiting their farm.