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USDA Assists Farmers, Ranchers, and Communities Affected by Tropical Storm Claudette

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has directed the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to aid recovery efforts for residents, farmers and ranchers affected by the devastation across the Southeast caused by Tropical Storm Claudette. USDA staff in regional, state, and county offices are ready to respond and are providing a variety of program flexibilities and other assistance to affected communities and agricultural producers.

"USDA is there to help producers and communities impacted by the severe rain and flooding from the Gulf to the Carolinas,” said Secretary Vilsack. “Visit farmers.gov or your local USDA Service Center to find out what assistance may be available to you."

Food safety guidance:

USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is helping ensure residents are taking the proper steps to reduce the risk of foodborne illness as they return to their homes after severe weather and flooding.

  • Drink only bottled water that has not been in contact with flood water. Discard any bottled water that may have come in contact with flood water – screw-caps are not waterproof. If you don’t have bottled water, learn how to safely boil or disinfect water at FSIS Consumer's Guide to Food Safety: Severe Storms and Hurricanes webpage.
  • Discard any food or beverage that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance it may have come in contact with flood water. Containers with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops and crimped caps are not waterproof.
  • Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches such as flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches, can be saved by following the steps at the FSIS Consumer's Guide to Food Safety: Severe Storms and Hurricanes webpage.
  • Thoroughly wash all metal pans, utensils and ceramic dishes that came in contact with flood water with hot soapy water. Rinse, then sanitize, by boiling them in clean water or by immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of one of tablespoon unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water.
  • Discard wooden cutting boards, plastic utensils, baby bottle nipples and pacifiers that may have come in contact with flood water – they cannot be saved after contact with flood water.

Risk management and disaster assistance for agricultural operations:

USDA offers several risk management and disaster assistance options to help producers recover after disasters.

Even before disasters strike, USDA provides tools for producers to manage their risk through the Federal Crop Insurance Program, a public-private partnership between USDA’s Risk Management Agency and private companies and agents. For crops that do not have crop insurance available, the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) is available through the local Farm Service Agency. This risk protection includes crop production loss and tree loss for certain crop insurance products. Producers should reach out to their crop insurance agent or local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office for more information.

Producers who suffer losses and are signed up for Federal Crop Insurance or NAP are asked to report crop damage to their crop insurance agent or local FSA office, respectively, within 72 hours of discovering damage and follow up in writing within 15 days.

Livestock and perennial crop producers often have more limited risk management options available, so there are several disaster programs for them. Key programs offered by USDA’s Farm Service Agency include:

It is also critical that producers keep accurate records to document damage or loss and to report losses to their local USDA Service Center as soon as possible.

Source : usda.gov

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