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USDA Export Sales Report

Wheat:   Net sales of 314,500 metric tons for delivery in the 2014/2015 marketing year were down 54 percent from the previous week and 15 percent from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for Japan (119,400 MT), Chile (47,300 MT), Venezuela (29,200 MT), Algeria (20,000 MT), Mexico (20,000 MT), Italy (17,200 MT), and Nigeria (14,800 MT).  Decreases were reported for unknown destinations (6,200 MT).  Exports of 771,800 MT--a marketing-year high--were up 38 percent from the previous week and 34 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were Japan (164,000 MT), Mexico (93,100 MT), South Korea (68,000 MT), Sri Lanka (65,700 MT), Brazil (55,000 MT), Malaysia (49,900 MT), and the Philippines (49,800 MT). 

Optional Origin Sales:   For 2014/2015, outstanding optional origin sales total 40,000 MT, all Algeria.

Exports for Own Account:  New exports for own account were reported to Italy (21,000 MT).  The current exports for own account balance is 37,200 MT, all Italy.   

Corn:  Net sales of 659,700 MT for 2014/2015 were reported primarily for Peru (142,500 MT, including 60,000 MT switched from unknown destinations), Japan (126,000 MT, including 4,500 MT switched from unknown destinations), Mexico (104,500 MT), Guatemala (84,200 MT, including 35,800 MT switched from Costa Rica and 21,400 MT switched from unknown destinations), and South Korea (68,300 MT, including 65,000 MT switched from unknown destinations).  Decreases were reported for Costa Rica (32,300 MT), Canada (8,300 MT), and Egypt (3,200 MT).  Exports of 722,400 MT were primarily to Mexico (175,200 MT), Japan (91,400 MT), South Korea (87,000 MT), Colombia (69,000 MT), Egypt (64,800 MT), Peru (61,400 MT), Guatemala (40,100 MT), and Venezuela (37,000 MT).

Barley:  Net sales of 42,600 MT for 2014/2015--marketing-year high--were reported for unknown destinations (25,000 MT), Japan (17,000 MT), and Taiwan (600 MT).  Net sales reductions of 25,000 MT for 2015/2016 were reported for unknown destinations.  Exports of 900 MT were reported to Taiwan (800 MT) and South Korea (100 MT).

Sorghum: Net sales of 332,400 MT for 2014/2015 were reported for China.  Exports of 111,500 MT were reported to China.  

Rice:  Net sales of 30,700 MT for 2014/2015were down 4 percent from the previous week and 37 percent from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for Mexico (7,900 MT), Honduras (6,700 MT), unknown destinations (4,700 MT), South Korea (3,000 MT), and Haiti (2,600 MT).  Exports of 13,500 MT were down 31 percent from the previous week and 52 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were to Mexico (3,600 MT), Jordan (3,000 MT), Canada (3,000 MT), Saudi Arabia (1,400 MT), and Taiwan (500 MT). 

Soybeans:  Net sales of 1,466,100 MT for 2014/2015 were reported primarily for China (546,300 MT, including 63,000 MT switched from unknown destinations), unknown destinations (469,100 MT), Egypt (73,000 MT), Germany (67,400 MT, including 70,000 MT switched from unknown destinations and decreases of 2,600 MT), and Canada (50,700 MT).  Decreases were reported for Costa Rica (1,300 MT).  Net sales of 2,400 MT for 2015/2016 were reported for Japan.  Exports of 204,200 MT were primarily to Germany (67,400 MT), China (59,200 MT), Malaysia (25,200 MT), Mexico (15,500 MT), and Costa Rica (12,000 MT).

Optional Origin Sales:   For 2014/2015, new optional origin sales totaling 421,000 MT were reported for China (360,000 MT) and Egypt (61,000 MT).  Exports for own account to China (55,500 MT) were applied to new or outstanding sales.  Outstanding optional origin sales total 1,498,500 MT, and are for China (1,272,500 MT), Egypt (181,000 MT), and Mexico (45,000 MT).

Soybean Cake and Meal:  Net sales of 16,200 MT for 2013/2014 were for Venezuela (26,000 MT), Guatemala (9,100 MT, including 9,600 MT switched from unknown destinations and decreases of 400 MT), Trinidad (3,100 MT), Canada (2,000 MT), unknown destinations (800 MT), and Bangladesh (700 MT).   Decreases were reported for Mexico (25,900 MT) and Honduras (700 MT).   Net sales of 183,500 MT for 2014/2015 were reported primarily for Mexico (121,800 MT), the Dominican Republic (24,000 MT), unknown destinations (10,100 MT), and Turkey (8,500 MT).   Decreases were reported for Ecuador (4,000 MT) and Trinidad (3,000 MT).   Exports of 67,000 MT were down 25 percent from the previous week and 7 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were Mexico (26,900 MT), Canada (19,500 MT), Costa Rica (5,300 MT), Venezuela (4,000 MT), and Saudi Arabia (3,900 MT).

Soybean Oil:  Net sales of 10,700 MT for 2013/2014 were up 84 percent from the previous week and up noticeably from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for Mexico (5,500 MT), Nicaragua (4,100 MT), El Salvador (800 MT), and Trinidad (200 MT).   Net sales of 17,800 MT for 2014/2015 were reported for unknown destinations (10,000 MT), Mexico (5,500 MT), Colombia (2,000 MT, and the Dominican Republic (300 MT).   Exports of 1,500 MT were down 76 percent from the previous week and 88 percent from the prior 4-week average.   The primary destinations were Mexico (1,000 MT, Trinidad (200 MT), and Canada (200 MT).

Cotton:  Net Upland sales of 75,000 RB for 2014/2015 were up noticeably from the previous week and 34 percent and from the prior 4-week average.  Increases reported for Mexico (23,600 RB), Turkey (13,200 RB), El Salvador (8,400 RB), India (7,300 RB), Vietnam (6,100 RB, including 400 RB switched from Japan, 100 RB switched from unknown destinations, and 500 RB switched from China), and China (5,100 RB).   Decreases were reported for South Korea (1,800 RB).   Net sales reductions of 1,100 RB for 2015/2016 resulted as increases for Honduras (2,600 RB) and El Salvador (1,100 RB), were more than offset by decreases for South Korea (4,800 RB).  Exports of 104,500 RB were up 25 percent from the previous week and 7 percent from the prior 4-week average.   The primary destinations were China (24,300 RB), Mexico (19,000 RB), Vietnam (16,600 RB), Turkey (9,800 RB), and South Korea (5,900 RB).  Net American Pima sales of 5,000 RB for 2014/2015 were up noticeably from the previous week and 52 percent from the prior 4-week average.   Increases were for India (2,800 RB), China (1,000 RB), Thailand (600 RB, including 200 RB switched from Japan), and Pakistan (300 RB).   Exports of 4,100 RB were primarily to Peru (1,400 RB), India (1,300 RB), Indonesia (400 RB), and Thailand (400 RB).

Optional Origin Sales:  For 2013/2014, outstanding optional origin sales total 16,200 RB, and are for Thailand (11,300 RB), South Korea (4,600 RB), and Vietnam (300 RB).

Exports for Own Account:  The current exports for own account balance is 54,300 RB, all China.

Export Adjustments:  Accumulated exports to Mexico were adjusted down 200 RB for week ending August 28, 2014.

Hides and Skins:  Net sales of 335,300 pieces (all whole cattle hides) were down 17 percent from the previous week and 3 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were for China (275,400 pieces), South Korea (22,600 pieces), Mexico (12,700 pieces), and Taiwan (9,600 pieces).  Decreases were reported for Thailand (300 pieces) and Portugal (200 pieces).  Exports of 442,700 pieces were up 23 percent from the previous and 17 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were to China (273,100 pieces), South Korea (111,800 pieces), Mexico (23,900 pieces), Thailand (8,400 pieces), and Taiwan (6,500 pieces).

Net sales of 62,200 wet blues for 2014 were down 68 percent from the previous week and 27 percent from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for China (15,500 unsplit and 4,900 grain splits), Thailand (18,000 unsplit), Italy (15,500 unsplit), and Vietnam (4,800 unsplit).  Decreases were reported for India (1,600 grain splits), Italy (600 grain splits),  and South Korea (200 unsplit).  Net sales of 3,200 wet blues for 2015 were for China (2,000 unsplit), India (700 unsplit and 500 grain splits).  Exports of 137,000 wet blues were primarily to China (44,800 unsplit and 7,400 grain splits), Italy (15,800 grain splits and 8,200 unsplit), Vietnam (11,400 unsplit), and Mexico (12,100 grain splits and 2,100 unsplit).  Net sales of splits totaling 447,900 pounds for 2014 were reported for Hong Kong (200,000 pounds), Taiwan (200,000 pounds), and South Korea (47,900 pounds).  Exports of 224,800 pounds were reported to South Korea.

Export Adjustments:  Accumulated exports to Japan were adjusted down 1,645 pieces for week ending August 28, 2014.

Beef:  Net sales of 15,600 MT for 2014 were up 12 percent from the previous week and 49 percent from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for Hong Kong (6,000 MT), Japan (4,700 MT), Mexico (1,300 MT), South Korea (1,200 MT), and Taiwan (900 MT).  Exports of 14,800 MT were up 29 percent from the previous week and 15 percent from the prior 4-week average.  The primary destinations were Japan (4,500 MT), Hong Kong (2,800 MT), South Korea (2,400 MT), Mexico (2,200 MT), and Taiwan (1,000 MT).

Pork:  Net sales of 22,900 MT for 2014 were up 44 percent from the previous week and 34 percent from the prior 4-week average.  Increases were reported for Mexico (5,900 MT), Canada (5,500 MT), China (3,600 MT), Japan (2,100 MT), and Hong Kong (1,800 MT).  Exports of 17,800 MT were primary to Mexico (6,400 MT), Japan (3,700 MT), South Korea (2,400 MT), Canada (1,800 MT), and Hong Kong (1,300 MT).

Source: USDA


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