Farms.com Home   Ag Industry News

Administration invests $62.8M in tribal agriculture and food sovereignty

USDA announces major funding and programs to support tribal nations and indigenous foods

By Farms.com

The Administration is making significant investments to strengthen Tribal food sovereignty and agriculture through a $62.8 million initiative announced by USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack. This initiative encompasses several programs and funding opportunities to support Tribal Nations.

The Indigenous Animals Harvesting and Meat Processing Grant Program is awarding over $42 million to eight Tribal Nations.

This funding will help expand processing opportunities for animals native to North America, such as bison and salmon. Key recipients include the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the Passamaquoddy Tribe, and the Ponca Tribe.

Additionally, $18 million is being invested in 23 projects under the Tribal Forest Protection Act. These projects focus on reducing hazardous fuels, restoring watersheds, and incorporating Indigenous knowledge into sustainable land management.

Notable projects include the Keex'Kwaan Community Forest Partnership and the Rio Chama Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program.

USDA is also awarding $2.3 million to support the inclusion of Indigenous foods in school meal programs.

Organizations like the Wind River Food Sovereignty project and the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement will receive grants to increase access to traditional Indigenous foods in schools and provide relevant nutrition education.

USDA is launching a new Tribal agriculture internship program. Through the Future Leaders in Public Service Internship Program, 14 students will gain hands-on experience in USDA programs benefiting Indian Country.

This program aims to cultivate a new generation of agricultural professionals well-versed in Tribal food and agriculture issues.

USDA will conduct its first-ever international trade mission focused on Tribal Nation and Native Hawaiian Community businesses. This mission, set to take place in Canada, will showcase Tribal agribusinesses to prospective buyers, enhancing market opportunities.


Trending Video

Soil health vital to Ohio vegetable farmer

Video: Soil health vital to Ohio vegetable farmer

Farmer Lee Jones dons his trademark bib overalls, white shirt and red bow tie at his Ohio vegetable farm. The operation ships far and wide but starts with soil and the people who work on it.