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Precision Spot Spraying with WeedSeeker 2

Precision Spot Spraying with WeedSeeker 2

System Targets Specific Weeds, Saving up to 90% on Herbicides

By Ryan Ridley
Farms.com

PTx Trimble ‘s WeedSeeker 2 is a second-generation see and spray system designed to save you on your herbicide application, by up to 90 percent.  

Farms.com recently talked with Cory Buchs, senior product director with PTx Trimble, who highlighted the benefits and functionalities of this spot spray system. 

The WeedSeeker 2 system is engineered to drastically reduce herbicide usage on farms, potentially saving you up to 90% in application costs.  

It achieves this efficiency through advanced detection technology that identifies green vegetation in fields and applies herbicides only where needed.  

This targeted approach is particularly useful during the pre-emergence phase in spring and the burn-down phase at the end of the growing season. 

One of the standout features of the WeedSeeker 2 is its flexibility. The system includes its own light source, which allows it to operate effectively both day and night, unlike many other camera-based systems that depend on natural light.  

Moreover, the WeedSeeker 2 is versatile enough to be used across various types of crops, including major cash crops like corn, soybeans, and wheat, as well as in specialized settings such as vineyards and orchards.  

Its compatibility extends to various display systems as well. 

Although it integrates seamlessly with PTx Trimble’s own displays, it is also compatible with any ISOBUS system display, making it easy to adopt and implement on a wide range of existing farm equipment. 

By focusing on areas that require treatment, WeedSeeker 2 not only saves you on input costs but also supports sustainable farming practices.  

Buchs gives you the full rundown of the technology in the below video. 




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