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HORSCH’s Joker RX Is No Laughing Matter

HORSCH’s Joker RX Is No Laughing Matter

Fourth Generation of High-Speed Discs

By Ryan Ridley
Farms.com

With a name like Joker, you might think there is some hilarity involved. But you could not be more wrong when it comes to HORSCH’s Joker RX. 

HORSCH introduced its high-speed discs to North America in 2007. The Joker RX represents the fourth generation. 

Farms.com caught up with Jeremy Hughes, Product Manager with HORSCH, to give us the rundown on this innovative tillage tool. 

A standout feature of the Joker RX is its blade system. 

It uses a 17° angle both in the front and back, allowing for excellent tracking and consistent soil engagement and resulting in a uniformly prepared seed bed. 

The Joker RX also incorporates a symmetrical torsion clamp system. 

This innovative design ensures that the torsion bars maintain steady blade angle engagement in the soil, even in challenging conditions. This feature allows the unit to maintain its efficiency and effectiveness across varied terrains. 

Material flow from the front gang to the back is seamless, added Hughes.  

The Joker RX finishes with the RingFlex Finishing System at the rear, which consolidates the soil and residue, providing a smooth surface for planting or seeding.  

“Performance adjustments on the joker are very, very simple,” says Hughes. 

It features simple adjustment points for the front hitch and depth, along with an electronic depth control system accessible via a tablet in the cab. This ease of use allows operators to make quick adjustments to suit specific field conditions or requirements. 

The Joker is not only effective for spring seed bed preparation but also excels in shallow fall primary tillage, aiding in the decomposition of crop residues and preparing the field for the next planting season. 

Hughes gives you an up-close look of the Joker RX in the below video. 




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