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Beefing up agriculture research at Lakeland College

Vermillion, Alberta - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada -- Lakeland College in Vermilion is getting a $1.9 million grant to transition two critical agriculture research programs.
 
This investment in research will also expand research capacity and teaching opportunities for the next generation of researchers in Alberta.
 
An agreement is nearly complete that will allow the college to grow and leverage its existing research capacity. This will make way for new learning opportunities for instructors and students as well as more collaboration with industry.
 
The three-year agreement will support Lakeland College to take over Pulse Agronomy and Beef Production Systems programs in Alberta.
 
The Pulse Agronomy program is a mixture of extension and pulse research projects across Alberta that facilitates the growth of the agriculture and food industry and enhances rural sustainability.
 
The Beef Production Systems program focuses on livestock disease and pathogens, pain mitigation strategies, and production efficiency including beef forage, feed rations and genetics.
 
This agreement is part of the Alberta government’s commitment to ensure farmers and ranchers lead agriculture research priorities. Establishing Results Driven Agriculture Research (RDAR), an arm’s-length, non-profit corporation, was the first step to ensure research funding priorities are producer-led. Over the long term, RDAR will assume ongoing responsibility for funding agreements. Alberta’s government has committed $370 million in provincial funding to agriculture research over the next 10 years.
 
This investment in agriculture research capacity at Lakeland College is being made possible by the governments of Canada and Alberta, through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership and the Strategic Research and Development Program.
Source : Canada.ca

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