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GRAZING CATTLE ON CROPLAND CAN BE MUTUALLY BENEFICIAL

When we hear stories of farms from previous generations, mixed operations are often the tradition, where people grew crops and had some cattle and other livestock as well. With economies of scale and farm size increasing, farms have generally become more specialized. However, recent rises in input costs and climate crises such as drought have many producers rethinking integrated farming operations.  

This may mean owning both cattle and cropland, but it could also mean working with neighbours. In some situations, beef producers have been working with their cropping neighbours to develop mutually beneficial deals where both parties can benefit from having cattle on cropland.  

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Let's Play With The Lambs!

Video: Let's Play With The Lambs!

Experience the joy of watching lambs frolicking in the pasture with us today. From observing their growth to enjoying their playful antics, we take you through each paddock where the lambs roam freely. Highlights include the excitement of the Suffolk ewe lambs discovering a jumping bale and participating in lamb races, as well as checking on Little Mister, our Dorset ram lamb, as he grazes on fresh grass.