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Saskatchewan Crop Development Lagging

Crop development in Saskatchewan is lagging amid overly dry conditions in the western portions of the province and wet, cool weather in the east. 

The latest weekly crop report on Thursday showed more than half of the oilseeds in the province (54%) are behind in terms of normal development, along with 43% of the spring cereals. More than one-third of the pulses are also considered to be behind, as well as 20% of the fall cereals. 

Last year at this time, only 27% and 15% of the oilseeds and spring cereals were behind, respectively, along with 15% of the pulses and 20% of the fall cereals. 

There was rain throughout all regions of Saskatchewan this past week, with some areas seeing higher amounts of localized precipitation. Growing conditions have been reported to be good in the southeast and east central regions amid adequate moisture and warm weather. In the western regions, rain was received, which was needed to keep crop development progressing and support pasture growth. Producers who did not receive rain are reporting their crops are “starting to go backward in development,” the report said

Cropland topsoil moisture was rated as 9% surplus, 75% adequate, 15% short and 1% very short as of Monday, versus 7% surplus, 65% adequate, 19% short and 9% very short a week earlier. 

Southeast: 

Throughout most of the southeast, growing conditions are very good as moisture is abundant and there have been some warm days over the past week. Due to a delay in seeding for many producers, some crops will be emerging just now, but they should catch up if conditions remain favourable. 

Producers who have missed the last week of rain have noticed how quickly their fields have dried out. 

Rainfall varied in the region with some of the lowest volumes received being less than five mm. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as 13 per cent surplus, 76 per cent adequate and eleven per cent short.  

Regionally, 61 per cent of the fall cereals, 39 per cent of the spring cereals, 36 per cent of the oilseed crops and 51 per cent of the pulse crops are at their normal stages of development for this time of year. Twenty-eight per cent of the fall cereals, 56 per cent of the spring cereals, 63 per cent of the oilseed crops and 46 per cent of the pulse crops are behind in crop development. 

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