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UGG elevator in Creston under deconstruction

UGG elevator in Creston under deconstruction

The white elevator was built in 1936

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

An 88-year-old white grain elevator in Creston, B.C. will be coming down.

The former United Grain Growers (UGG) elevator, built in 1936 to store wheat, barley, oats and rye, is now in an unsalvageable state.

“This decision comes after careful consideration of the engineering, health and safety, and financial challenges posed by the white elevator,” the Columbia Basin Trust, a Crown corporation that manages its assets for ongoing economic, environmental and social benefit of the Columbia Basin region, said in a June 17 statement.

The Trust purchased the white elevator, and a red Alberta Wheat Pool elevator beside it, in 2018 to help preserve local history.

At the time, the structures, two of the four wooden elevators in all of B.C., belonged to Ray Gauthier, who purchased them between 2000 and 2004. He used the elevators to sell seed and feed and purchase grain from local farmers for shipment to Alberta and Vancouver.

Though the white UGG elevator is coming down, officials will work with the community to ensure its memory remains.

Reclaimed materials “will be repurposed in future projects. Additionally, videos and photographs will document the white elevator, which will be used to create display signage,” an information page says.

Discussions will also occur on how to use the vacant space.

The red Alberta Wheat Pool elevator is stable and in use.

Renovations on that structure started in 2019 and included a new roof, new siding, fresh paint and window and door restoration.

Today it’s the site of the Kunze Gallery, which showcases art from multiple local artists.

Steve Boyko photo


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