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Daniel Ling Joins MSU Research Equipment Maintenance Team in Support of PSSB

Meet Daniel Ling, who recently joined MSU staff as a Research and Instructional Equipment Technologist II, a position shared between PSM and Horticulture, attending to maintenance needs in research labs in the PSSB building.

Dan comes to MSU after working with State of Michigan for nearly 30 years, with experience related to atmospheric sampling: building new stations, and installing, operating and maintain equipment.

Originally from Dewitt, Dan is a lifelong resident of central Michigan. Dan says he discovered early that he had a knack for fixing things, and then, for fixing scientific instruments, which opened doors to more and varied responsibilities in and around environmental quality sampling and analysis, through which he acquired a broad range of skills.

Dan says he has seen big environmental changes over his time in the field. Ground-level ozone forms when nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds react with each other in sunlight and hot temperatures. Michigan has been measuring ozone since the 1870s. Now 27 instruments measure ground-level ozone state-wide. When he started in air quality, the State of Michigan monitored ozone for 6 months of the year starting in April. “And now they’re sampling for 8 months of the year beginning March 1," indicating a definite increase in the duration of conditions that lead to ground-level ozone in Michigan.

Dan also enjoys hunting and fishing with his extended family, including three grown children. He has maintained hunting property up north for about 20 years, and has a cabin on Drummond Island the gem of Lake Huron.

Dan Ling’s office is A 45 in the basement, but he’s usually on the go – so he is best contacted through email lingdani@msu.edu

Source : msu.edu

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