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Oklahoma Wheat Crop Condition Drops 9 Points But Still Ranks Among The Best in The Region According to Latest USDA Crop Progress Report

Oklahoma Wheat Crop Condition Drops 9 Points But Still Ranks Among The Best in The Region According to Latest USDA Crop Progress Report

Oklahoma’s winter wheat crop continues to be one of the better crops in the region, but the gap is shrinking as the Oklahoma crop is rated 61 percent in the good to excellent category this week, a 9-point drop from last week.

Compared to a year ago and the 5-year average, 2021 is so far running about on schedule with planting progress and crop maturity.

In the 18 major corn producing states farmers have planted 17 percent of their crop, 7 points behind last year but only 3 points behind the 5-year average for this date.

Texas (66 percent), Tennessee (48 percent) and North Carolina (62 percent) have the most corn planted so far.

Three percent of the corn crop has emerged, the same as last year and one point behind the average.

Soybean planters have started to move as farmers have planted 8 percent of the crop, one point more than a year ago and 3 points ahead of the average.

Cotton planting stands at 12 percent, one point behind last year and one point ahead of the average.

Grain sorghum farmers have planted 19 percent of their crop, one point behind last year and 3 points behind the average.

In the 18 major winter wheat states, the overall crop is rated 49 percent good to excellent, this compares with 53 percent last week and 54 percent a year ago. The remainder is rated 32 percent fair this week and 19 percent poor to very poor.

Approximately 17 percent of the wheat is headed, 3 points behind last year and 6 points behind the average.

To view the USDA Crop Progress Report, click here.

Specifically, for Oklahoma, wheat jointing reached 91 percent, down 4 points from the previous year but unchanged from normal.

Winter wheat headed reached 34 percent, down 13 points from the previous year and down 12 points from normal.

The Oklahoma wheat crop is rated 61 percent good to excellent, 27 percent fair and 12 percent poor to very poor (9 percent last week).

Canola blooming reached 64 percent, down 12 points from the previous year and down 18 points from normal. Canola coloring reached 1 percent.

Corn planted reached 30 percent, up 13 points from the previous year but down 2 points from normal.

Corn emerged reached 3 percent. Sorghum planted reached 1 percent, down 8 points from normal.

Soybeans planted reached 4 percent, unchanged from the previous year and unchanged from normal.

Pasture and range conditions were rated at 36 percent good to excellent, 43 percent fair and 21 percent poor to very poor.

To view the Oklahoma report, click here.

For Kansas, the winter wheat crop conditions were rated 55 percent good to excellent,28 percent fair and 17 percent poor to very poor.

Winter wheat jointed was 68 percent, ahead of 62 percent last year, and equal to the five-year average.

Wheat headed was 2 percent, equal to last year, and behind 12 percent average.

Kansas corn planted was 20 percent, near 22 percent last year, and behind 27 percent average.

Emerged was 6 percent, near 3 percent last year and 7 percent average.

Soybeans planted was 2 percent, equal to last year, and near 1 percent average.

To view the Kansas crop progress report, click here.

In Texas, small grains needed more moisture in many areas of the state.

Wheat producers in the Northern High Plains were waiting to see the damage done by below freezing mornings throughout last week.

Small grains in areas of the Southern High Plains, the Upper Coast, and Edwards Plateau were being baled for hay.

Freeze damage on wheat prompted farmers to start baling operations in the Southern Low Plains.

Small grains were progressing well in the Blacklands.

First cuttings of hay were underway in South East Texas.

Wheat was nearing maturity in South Central Texas, with harvest set to begin soon.

Overall, the Texas wheat crop is rated only 18 percent in the good to excellent category, a 10-point drop from last week, 39 percent fair and 43 percent in the poor to very poor category (36 percent last week).

In the Northern Low Plains, preparations were underway for corn planting.

Farmers continued pre-irrigation on cotton fields in the Southern High Plains.

Grain sorghum was reportedly impacted by the freeze in the Southern Low Plains.

Planting of grain sorghum, soybeans, and cotton was delayed in the Blacklands due to weather conditions.

Cotton was being planted in the Trans-Pecos.

Corn under pivots progressed well in Edwards Plateau.

Corn in South Central Texas continued to show signs of drought stress.

Producers sprayed weeds and replanted some cotton fields in the Upper Coast.

Cotton planting in South Texas continued.

Corn and grain sorghum producers were applying side dress fertilizer and cotton producers began fertilizing fields in the Lower Valley.

Pecan producers in the Southern High Plains and the Trans-Pecos had begun irrigation on some orchards.

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