Farms.com Home   News

Ontario Investing in Fire Safety in the North

THUNDER BAY — The Ontario government is investing close to $35 million in 17 new fire trucks, lifesaving firefighting equipment, and two new Mobile Live Fire Training Units to better protect northern communities and keep people safe.

“Our government is providing northern firefighters with the trucks, equipment, and training they need to save lives and keep property safe in northern Ontario,” said Solicitor General Michael Kerzner. “New trucks and modern equipment will ensure our brave women and men can safely tackle fires in this ever-changing climate.”

The Mobile Live Fire Training Units will help the Ontario Fire College deliver additional high-quality, hands-on training directly to fire services to help firefighters prepare for real life scenarios. These modern mobile units can be transported right to a local fire station and simulate real situations. During mobile unit training, firefighters experience real flames, extreme heat, high humidity, severely restricted visibility, and thick smoke.

“Investing in firefighter training and safety in the North is critical to safeguarding our communities,” said Ontario Fire Marshal Jon Pegg. “By equipping firefighters with the skills and training they need, we will fortify the resilience of northern Ontario, ensuring the safety and well-being of the people who call this region home.”

Funding for the new fire trucks and firefighting equipment will be delivered through the Northern Fire Protection Program which provides assistance and support for fire protection services in 47 communities that rely on more than 800 volunteer firefighters.

Source : Ministry of the Solicitor General

Trending Video

Ask A Farmer Podcast: What do Canadians think about our food system and farming practices?

Video: Ask A Farmer Podcast: What do Canadians think about our food system and farming practices?

There is a widening disconnect between those who grow food and those who consume food in Canada. To better communicate to Canadians, we must understand what their perceptions are of the food industry. Each year the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity performs a country wide survey to get a gauge on what Canadian consumers think about our food system and farming in general. Ashley Bruner from the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity has been part of this survey for year and will give us insight into what Canadians think.