Farms.com Home   News

Saskatchewan Crop Devlopment Lagging

Seeding is now complete, but Saskatchewan crop development is lagging amid continued soggy and cool conditions. 

The latest weekly crop report on Thursday said warmer temperatures are needed to support crop advancement. 

An estimated 29% of the spring cereals were behind normal development as of Monday, the report showed, along with 14% of the fall cereals and a major 41% of the oilseeds. Almost 20% of pulse crops were also behind normal development. 

Rain fell throughout much of the province again this past week with some areas receiving significant amounts. The highest rainfall recorded fell in the Rosthern area at 95 mm. Although the rain is supporting crop growth in some regions of the province, it is also causing crop stress and disease in other areas that received excess moisture. 

The report said up to 3% of seeded land in the province is flooded and unlikely to produce a crop. An estimated 1% of forage land will also not likely produce a crop due to wetness, while 1% of pasturelands are no longer accessible or useable either. 

Cropland topsoil moisture was rated 9% surplus, 88% adequate and 3% short as of Monday, versus 8% surplus, 90% adequate and 2% short the previous week. 

Producers report overall minor crop damage due to frost with some crops still being assessed, the report said. Excess moisture has caused moderate crop damage, with some crops reported to be yellowing and showing increases in leaf disease. Gophers, flea beetles and grasshoppers also continue to cause crop damage throughout the province.   

Southeast: 

With seeding complete within the region, producers are continuing to evaluate their crops. Spraying operations will continue as weather allows and producers will continue to monitor for pests and disease in the coming weeks. 

Producers indicate that one per cent of the land that was seeded this spring has excess moisture and is unlikely to produce a crop. One per cent of forage crops have excess moisture and are unlikely to produce a crop and one per cent of pastureland is not accessible or not usable at this time across the region. 

Areas within the region that are experiencing reduced moisture have expressed that five per cent of the land that was seeded this spring is struggling due to lack of moisture. Eight per cent of forage crops may have their yield significantly affected along with 12 per cent of pastures that may have their carrying capacity reduced. 

Most crops fall within the normal stages of development for this time of year, but cooler temperatures are slowing crop development within the region. Oilseeds have the largest impact from the cooler temperatures with 59 per cent reported at the normal stage of development with 31 per cent falling behind. Perennial forages are the furthest advanced in development with 21 per cent of the crop ahead of normal. 

Rain fell throughout the region with increased amounts falling in the east side of the region due to a storm with significant wind and heavy rain. The highest rain fell in the Bienfait and Alida areas with 48 mm and 47 mm, respectively. Cropland topsoil moisture is reported at five per cent surplus, 90 per cent adequate and five per cent short. 

Southwest: 

With the completion of seeding in the region, producers are continuing to evaluate their crops. As weather conditions allow, spraying operations will continue and producers continue to monitor their crops for pests and diseases. 

Areas within the region that are experiencing reduced moisture have expressed that nine per cent of the land that was seeded this spring is struggling due to lack of moisture. Five per cent of forage crops may have their yield significantly affected along with eight per cent of pastures that may have their carrying capacity reduced. 

Most crops fall within the normal stages of development for this time of year. Oilseeds show to be the furthest behind with 16 per cent falling behind the normal stages of development. Perennial forages and fall cereals are the furthest advanced in development with seven per cent of the crop ahead of normal. 

Rain was variable throughout the region this week. The highest amount of rain fell within the Eston area at 30 mm followed by the Richmound area at 27 mm. The Marquis area received 13 mm and the Shaunavon area received 8 mm. A few areas reported trace rainfall for the past week. 

Topsoil moisture has decreased slightly within the region. Cropland topsoil moisture is reported at three per cent surplus, 92 per cent adequate and five per cent short. 

Click here to see more...

Trending Video

Senate Ag Republicans Release Farm Bill Framework

Video: Senate Ag Republicans Release Farm Bill Framework

This week, Senator John Boozeman of Arkansas, ranking member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, released the Republican membership’s framework for the 2024 Farm Bill.