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State of the Atlantic Ocean report shows the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems

Ottawa, Ontario - Canada’s Atlantic Ocean is one of the most productive marine environments in the world. It is home to an abundance of biodiversity from crabs, to lobsters and wild fish stocks, and supports  more than 55,000 jobs in industries like fishing, aquaculture and tourism. The Atlantic Ocean is vital for Canada’s economy and culture, and it is important that we continue to invest in science and research to ensure the government and our partners understand the current state and pressures our oceans are facing. This data will help inform the steps we need to take to protect both the environment and the economy. 
 
The Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson, announced the release of a new report, Canada’s Oceans Now–Atlantic Ecosystems, 2018. The interactive report, prepared by Fisheries and Oceans Canada with contributions from Environment and Climate Change Canada, is the Department’s first Atlantic Ocean status report in an annual series informing Canadians of the current state of Canada’s oceans. It highlights our knowledge of Atlantic Ocean ecosystems and how they are influenced by the changing environment.
 
Global climate change is affecting Atlantic Ocean ecosystems in Canada in many ways. Atlantic Ocean waters are warming causing reduced sea ice, rising sea levels, changes to ocean currents and more acidic water. Warmer temperatures also contribute to shifts in some marine communities and their habitats. These physical and biological changes are having serious impacts on the health of Atlantic Ocean ecosystems including shellfish, fish, marine mammals and seabirds.
 
Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists regularly monitor and conduct research on the oceans to track the status and trends occurring over time. Monitoring is essential to helping uncover how marine ecosystems are connected and how they are changing. The baseline data collected through this monitoring is essential to making responsible management decisions for our oceans, fisheries and coastal infrastructure.
Source : Government Of Canada