Farms.com Home   News

North Dakota sets up hotline for farmers

Hotline available for farmers impacted by pipeline protests

By Diego Flammini
Assistant Editor, North American Content
Farms.com

The North Dakota Department of Agriculture has set up a hotline for farmers to use if they’re being affected by the Dakota Access Pipeline protests.

Farmers can call the Farm/Ranch Emergency Assistance Hotline at 701-425-8454 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday to Friday, to be matched up with individuals available for hire.

Multiple reports indicate the protests have turned violent at times, resulting in truck drivers and silage chopping services refusing to provide their services.

North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said it is crucial farmers get their work completed before winter sets in.


Doug Goehring

“Many farmers and ranchers near the protest area urgently need assistance to finish their seasonal work before inclement weather sets in,” Goehring said in a release. “There is frustration with trying to hire local truckers to haul livestock, grain and hay; as well as in hiring custom silage-chopping services. We are appealing to those who can provide these services to contact the hotline.”

According to the Associated Press, Energy Transfer Partners is trying to complete a 1,200-mile pipeline from North Dakota to Illinois. Protesters are concerned about potential impacts on drinking water.

In the event of protestors blocking access for farmers, Goehring encouraged producers to use the proper resources.

“Those in need of assistance in conducting their normal agricultural activities should call the Morton County Sheriff’s Department at 701-667-3330,” Goehring said in a release. “They will do their best to assist in providing safe passage to get the work done.”


Trending Video

Cow-Calf Corner - Beef Cattle Milk Production

Video: Cow-Calf Corner - Beef Cattle Milk Production

OSU Extension beef cattle specialist Dave Lalman shares research findings on how management practices can impact lactation potential in beef cattle.
 

Comments


Your email address will not be published