Farms.com Home   News

Emergency Hay Drops Rescue Stranded Cows in Northern California

In Northern California, recent winter storms have left several herds of cows stranded in remote locations with limited access to food and water. In response, local ranchers and authorities have come together to launch emergency hay drops, delivering much-needed sustenance to the stranded animals. 

Using helicopters and other heavy equipment, teams have been able to transport large bales of hay to areas where cows are trapped, providing temporary relief until conditions improve. The effort has been a collaborative one, with ranchers donating hay and equipment, while authorities coordinate logistics and oversee the delivery operations. 

While the hay drops have been a critical lifeline for these animals, challenges remain. Many roads and trails remain impassable due to heavy snow and debris, limiting the ability to reach all areas in need. In addition, the cost of the operation is significant, with some estimates placing the total cost in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. 

Despite these challenges, ranchers and authorities remain committed to providing relief for the stranded cows. The effort underscores the critical role that local communities play in responding to natural disasters and supporting the welfare of animals in need. 

The emergency hay drops serve as a reminder of the resilience and compassion of those working to support the well-being of animals in difficult circumstances. As the winter season continues, it is likely that further efforts will be needed to support these and other animals affected by extreme weather events. 


Trending Video

Beef and Corn: Working together for Farmers and Ranchers

Video: Beef and Corn: Working together for Farmers and Ranchers

Corn has long played an important role as a feed source for cattle and, as a result, there is a close relationship between corn and cattle producers. We talk with Troy Schneider of the National Corn Growers Association about this important partnership.