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FCC’s Drive Away Hunger $1 million match program doubles Drive Away Hunger donations

Drive Away Hunger is welcoming business leader Arlene Dickinson as a partner in the fight against food insecurity in Canada.

Dickinson’s venture capital fund, District Ventures Capital, recently donated over $52,000 of food through a group of its agriculture and food portfolio companies to national food rescue organization, Second Harvest. A donation that is now being matched by FCC’s $1 million dollar match program in recognition of Drive Away Hunger’s 20th year.

Dickinson and FCC president and CEO Justine Hendricks have a common goal to address increasing food insecurity in Canada. They both encourage more Canadian agriculture and food companies to donate to food security agencies. Through Drive Away Hunger, companies can use the FCC match program until the end of this year.

“Over 6.9 million Canadians face food insecurity and we have a very productive agriculture and food industry that can help,” said Dickinson. “I encourage producers and businesses, big or small, to donate food or money through Drive Away Hunger. This is a simple way to join an already impressive program that is coordinating food and money donations and directing them to food security agencies in need.”

A proud ambassador for Second Harvest Canada, the largest food rescue charity in Canada, where some Drive Away Hunger donations are directed, Dickinson sees potential for the Canadian agriculture and food industry to be a leader in addressing growing food insecurity across the country. Like FCC, her venture capital fund, District Ventures Capital is committed to supporting the agriculture and food industry, making these partnerships valuable.

“One of my priorities as CEO of FCC is addressing food insecurity and rallying the industry to do the same. As a business leader who invests in agriculture and food companies, Arlene’s passion to raise money and donations to support food security agencies is a great opportunity to work together,” said Hendricks. “This challenge of hunger is something we can address when we come together as business leaders, as an industry and as people who care about doing the right thing.”

For two decades, Drive Away Hunger has brought the agriculture and food industry together to support food banks and food security programs. Last year, Drive Away Hunger raised a record 40 million meals and FCC hopes to inspire an even bigger impact this year with its match program and a goal of raising 60 million meals.

FCC’s match will be shared by Food Banks Canada and Second Harvest Canada who will direct the funding to underserved rural and remote areas in need of support. With 29 per cent of Canada’s food banks in rural and remote communities, food in these areas can be more expensive and difficult to access.

“Drive Away Hunger is an excellent program to get Canadian agriculture and food companies pulling in the same direction when it comes to making a difference for those in need,” adds Dickinson. “I have seen firsthand the innovation, ingenuity and generosity of the people who have built strong businesses that are a part of an important economic driver in this country. Donating through Drive Away Hunger is another way to demonstrate that business leadership.”

Being a part of the Drive Away Hunger community is easy to do. Donations can come in the form of cash or food; it all makes a difference. Nearly 20 per cent of Canadians are getting their food from charitable organizations like food banks. The demand continues to increase, and the Canadian food system can provide help through its vast network of agricultural and food companies and producers.

“I have so much gratitude for everyone who participates in Drive Away Hunger and helps us reach more people who need support,” said Hendricks. “Arlene put out the call earlier this year challenging corporate Canada to donate before Thanksgiving. Now, we appreciate her support of Drive Away Hunger to keep the momentum of generosity going into the holiday season when budgets are stretched.”

Drive Away Hunger has evolved over its 20 years into an industry-driven initiative that works together for vulnerable Canadians. Through the program, donors in the industry can get connected with charitable food security agencies in hopes of creating long-term, sustainable relationships. FCC works with partners to identify opportunities and create meaningful results in communities across Canada.

Cash and food donations can be made online at driveawayhunger.ca.

FCC is Canada’s leading agriculture and food lender, dedicated to the industry that feeds the world. FCC employees are committed to the long-standing success of those who produce and process Canadian food by providing flexible financing, AgExpert business management software, information and knowledge. FCC provides a complement of expertise and services designed to support the complex and evolving needs of food businesses. As a financial Crown corporation, FCC is a stable partner that reinvests profits back into the industry and communities it serves. For more information, visit fcc.ca. 


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