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Super-heavy load to affect travel in northeast Alberta

There will be a large, slow-moving load travelling from Edmonton to Fort McMurray starting on Tuesday, Dec. 5.

The large piece of industrial equipment being moved is 8.7 metres wide, 10.2 metres high, 47 metres long, weighs 483,000 kilograms and will be carried by a trailer with 352 wheels. Due to its large size and weight, it will only travel at 60 km/h and will use the entire width of the highway, including the shoulder. At times it will travel against the flow of traffic and in some areas power line lifts will be required.

The load will be escorted by four pilot vehicles that will block off lanes, close intersections and facilitate its movement along the route. At times there will also be a police escort to control traffic.

Motorists who encounter this convoy will experience delays and are asked to watch for the guide vehicles and flag people and be patient while it moves through the area.

Route
The load will leave Dacro in south Edmonton using the following route:

Day 1 – Tuesday, Dec. 5 (early morning)

  • Exit from 9325 51 Avenue, Edmonton
  • 51 Avenue eastbound
  • 75 Street southbound
  • Whitemud counterflow eastbound
  • Highway 216 southbound counterflow
  • Highway 14 eastbound (stage at 14/21 until daylight)

Day 1 – Tuesday, Dec. 5 (day move)

  • Highway 14 eastbound
  • Highway 36 northbound
  • Highway 45 eastbound (park at Two Hills Scale)

Day 2 – Wednesday, Dec. 6 (day move)

  • Highway 45 eastbound
  • Highway 36 northbound
  • Highway 29 eastbound
  • Highway 36 northbound
  • Highway 28 westbound
  • Highway 63 northbound (park at Radway Scale)

Day 3 – Thursday, Dec. 7 (day move)

  • Highway 63 northbound
  • Highway 55 eastbound
  • Highway 63 northbound (park at POE staging area)

Day 4 – Friday, Dec. 8 (night move)

  • Highway 63 northbound
  • Utilize ramps in Fort McMurray to avoid overpasses
  • Highway 63 northbound (use Suncor Ramp to miss overpass)

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