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Temple Grandin Urges Better Communication with Consumers about Cattle Handling

Grandin told the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association's annual meeting that it makes her angry when people don't know anything "about a lot of the good stuff we're doing."

"I've worked all my life to improve slaughter plants," she said Monday after her speech.

Grandin told the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association's annual meeting that it makes her angry when people don't know anything "about a lot of the good stuff we're doing."

"I've worked all my life to improve slaughter plants," she said Monday after her speech.

There is no equivalent certification in Canada.

But the Canadian Cattlemen's Association says most beef producers have adopted the National Farm Animal Care Council code of practice as the minimum acceptable standard.

Earls backtracked after facing a social media storm, but a past president of the association said industry needs to be more proactive as well.

"We can ... say we made a mistake too by not doing as good a job as we should have of talking about our humane animal handling ... and our code of practice and our standards that are world class, so we've got work to do," said Dave Solverson, who also spoke to the stock growers meeting.

The Canadian system isn't "certified humane," but standards "are similar or even exceed the requirements for American certified humane," Solverson said.

The beef code of practice is being integrated into the verified beef production-plus program, which records producer practices in animal care and welfare, sustainability and environment.

Solverson hopes that will "fill the gap" for markets that require verification and audits.

"Even though our producers are doing the things and we have the code of practice ... a lot of the retailers and food service people are trying to differentiate from others and they want their verification."

Source: Meatbusiness


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