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Baiting and Trapping Shown Effective in Capturing Wild Pigs

The Coordinator of Squeal on Pigs Manitoba says baiting and trapping appears to be the most effective way of capturing wild pigs and eliminating them from the landscape.Wild pigs contaminate water sources, damage natural habitats and farm crops, and can spread different diseases to commercial and small-scale livestock.

Squeal on Pigs Manitoba Coordinator Dr. Wayne Lees says wild pigs tend to be nocturnal and fairly elusive so the signs that most people would see would be crop damage.

Quote-Dr. Wayne Lees-Squeal on Pigs Manitoba:

Squeal on Pigs is a project to eliminate wild pigs from the landscape in Manitoba.These are an invasive species that don't belong here and they've caused a lot of damage, not just to crops but also to the environment and they also pose a risk for potential disease should we be inundated with a disease such as a foreign animal disease.

We've adopted a number of different strategies in order to, first of all, find out where the pigs are and then, once we find out where the pigs are, we go through a process of trying to set up cell cameras, a baiting station and then finally a trap.The trapping strategy seems to be the most effective for us.
It seems like if we set up the trap in an area where the pigs are and can attract them with bait, that seems to work the best.

Anyone who sees evidence of wild pigs is encouraged to call 1-833-SPOT-PIG or to file a report through the Squeal on Pigs Manitoba website at squealonpigsmb.org.

Source : Farmscape.ca

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