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Canada joins international sustainable agriculture production and food systems coalition

Ottawa, Ontario – Canadian farmers and producers are key drivers for advancing innovation and sustainability for our country’s agricultural and agri-food sector. As part of the Government of Canada’s approach to working in collaboration with international partners to mitigate the risks of climate change and create conditions for industry to remain competitive globally, Canada has joined the Sustainable Productivity Growth for Food Security and Resource Conservation coalition (SPG).

As an outcome of the United Nations Food Systems Summit, which took place in September 2021, Canada has joined more than 15 countries, as well as dozens of academic organizations, foundations and private sector associations, in becoming signatories of the SPG, led by the United States.

The coalition will work in collaboration to develop strategies focused on accelerating the transition to more sustainable food systems through agricultural productivity growth. Its work will be informed by ideas that optimize sustainability across social, economic, and environmental dimensions, including all sectors of agriculture.

Collaboration with coalition partners will provide Canada with an international platform to advocate for research, advance innovations and technologies, and facilitate productivity growth in our own agriculture and agri-food sector.

Canadian farmers have always been good stewards of the land and have a solid track record of sustainable agriculture, with sound management practices, and adopting innovative practices and technologies. Over the past two decades, farmers have doubled the value of production while stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts must continue in order to reduce emissions, given the pressing climate and environmental challenges at hand.

Source : Government of Canada

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