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Private Pesticide Applicator Certification/Recertification Training

Winter is the season for Private Pesticide Applicator certification and recertification. If you noticed that your license expired at the end of 2014 or if you need to obtain a license in 2015, there are many upcoming opportunities for you to do so.

You need to be certified as a Private Pesticide Applicator if you plan to apply any pesticides to an agriculture commodity worth $1000 or more. This applies to all types of pesticide (herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide, etc.).

How to Get Certified?

There are three ways to get certified or recertified in 2015 (all at no charge):

No matter how you choose to get certified or recertified you must bring along your government-issued photo identification (e.g. driver’s license, passport, military id, etc.). If you are recertifying or have ever been certified in the past, please bring along your certification number.

Why Certify?

First and foremost, you need to become certified because it’s the law. Certification also gives you the tools to apply pesticides properly, safely, and profitably. You must be competent to read and follow a label, calibrate your sprayer, and apply pesticides. Your certification is good for five years and allows you to buy and apply general and restricted use pesticides. A private applicator cannot accept cash for spraying applications but can trade agricultural services (e.g. you can spray your neighbor’s field if they bale your hay).

A private applicator is required to keep records for two years of all RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDES they apply. Record keeping is a requirement for restricted use pesticides but consider keeping records of all pesticide applications as part of a good farm management plan. Record keeping books and information are available at your local extension office or Regional Extension Center. There are a certain percentage of individuals who are spot checked by the State Department of Agriculture every year.

Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the free, 3-hour private applicator sessions listed above. For more information on a particular PAT, please contact the Field Specialist listed as the host.

- See more at: http://igrow.org/agronomy/corn/private-pesticide-applicator-certification-recertification-training/#sthash.mIpJIe9D.dpuf

By Connie Strunk
SDSU Extension Plant Pathology Field Specialist

Winter is the season for Private Pesticide Applicator certification and recertification. If you noticed that your license expired at the end of 2014 or if you need to obtain a license in 2015, there are many upcoming opportunities for you to do so.

You need to be certified as a Private Pesticide Applicator if you plan to apply any pesticides to an agriculture commodity worth $1000 or more. This applies to all types of pesticide (herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide, etc.).


How to Get Certified?

There are three ways to get certified or recertified in 2015 (all at no charge):

  •     Attend any of the 3-hour classes. The dates and locations for the classes are available through the SDDA or by visiting the iGrow Events Calendar.
  •     Stop by your local Extension Office or Regional Extension Center and pick-up the materials to complete the open-book home-study exam.
  •     Take the Private Applicator online exam through SDDA.


No matter how you choose to get certified or recertified you must bring along your government-issued photo identification (e.g. driver’s license, passport, military id, etc.). If you are recertifying or have ever been certified in the past, please bring along your certification number.


Why Certify?

First and foremost, you need to become certified because it’s the law. Certification also gives you the tools to apply pesticides properly, safely, and profitably. You must be competent to read and follow a label, calibrate your sprayer, and apply pesticides. Your certification is good for five years and allows you to buy and apply general and restricted use pesticides. A private applicator cannot accept cash for spraying applications but can trade agricultural services (e.g. you can spray your neighbor’s field if they bale your hay).

A private applicator is required to keep records for two years of all RESTRICTED USE PESTICIDES they apply. Record keeping is a requirement for restricted use pesticides but consider keeping records of all pesticide applications as part of a good farm management plan. Record keeping books and information are available at your local extension office or Regional Extension Center. There are a certain percentage of individuals who are spot checked by the State Department of Agriculture every year.

Individuals needing to become certified or recertified are encouraged to attend one of the free, 3-hour private applicator sessions listed above. For more information on a particular PAT, please contact the Field Specialist listed as the host.
 

Source:igrow.org


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