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U.S. corn enters silking stage

U.S. corn enters silking stage

About 4 percent of the crop is in this stage, the USDA reports

By Diego Flammini
Staff Writer
Farms.com

The U.S. corn crop has entered the next development stage.

About 4 percent of the national crop is silking, the USDA reports in its June 28 Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin. This is on par with last year’s progress.

With projections for U.S. corn acres sitting around 89.5 million acres in 2022, this means about 3,580,000 acres of corn are silking.

On a state level, corn in Texas is the furthest along.

About 70 percent of the state’s corn acres are silking, the USDA’s report says. This is up from 66 percent at this time last year.

Corn in North Carolina (39 percent), Tennessee (24 percent) and Kentucky (10 percent) are the other states with notable progress.

The U.S. soybean crop has also entered its next stage.

Around 7 percent of national soybean acres are blooming, the USDA’s report says. That number is down from 13 percent last year.

With soybean planting projections sitting at around 91 million acres, this means about 6,370,000 acres of soybeans are blooming.

Soybeans in Louisiana lead the way nationally.

About 82 percent of soybeans in that state are blooming, the USDA reported. That’s up from 65 percent last year around this time.

Approximately 66 percent of soybeans in Mississippi have bloomed, as have about 51 percent of the soybean crop in Arkansas.

U.S. producers interested in how corn and soybean crops are coming along in the Midwest can follow the 2022 U.S. Corn Belt Crop Tour.

The tour begins June 30 in Ohio and will travel through 12 different states, speaking with farmers and experts along the way.

Follow the tour on social media @FarmsMarketing or use the hashtag #cornbelt22.


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